Intellectual Disability Definition:

Intellectual disabilities refer to significantly subaverage general intellectual functioning* which exists concurrently with deficits in adaptive behavior that adversely affects educational performance and originates before age 18. [34 C.F.R ß 300.8(c)(6)] Intellectual disability does not include conditions primarily due to a sensory or physical impairment, traumatic brain injury, autism spectrum disorders, severe multiple impairments, cultural influences or a history of inconsistent and/or inadequate educational programming.

(a) Significantly subaverage general intellectual functioning is defined as approximately 70 IQ or below as measured by a qualified psychological examiner on individually administered, nationally normed standardized measures of intelligence.

(1) All IQ scores defining eligibility for children with intellectual disabilities shall be interpreted as a range of scores encompassed by not more than one standard error of measurement below and above the obtained score. The standard error of measurement for a test may be found in the technical data section of the test manual.

(2) Any final determination of the level of intellectual functioning shall be based on multiple sources of information and shall include more than one formal measure of intelligence administered by a qualified psychological examiner. There may be children with IQ scores below 70 who do not need special education. Interpretation of results should take into account factors that may affect test performance such as socioeconomic status, native language, and cultural background and associated disabilities in communication, sensory or motor areas.

(i). Significantly subaverage intellectual functioning must be verified through a written summary of at least one structured observation that demonstrates the childís inability to progress in a typical, age appropriate manner and with consideration for culturally relevant information, medical and education history.

(b)Deficits in adaptive behavior are defined as significant limitations in a childís effectiveness in meeting the standards of maturation, learning, personal independence or social responsibility, and especially school performance that is expected of the individual's age-level and cultural group, as determined by clinical judgment.

(1) The child demonstrates significantly subaverage adaptive behavior in school and home, and, if appropriate, community environments. These limitations in adaptive behavior shall be established through the use of standardized adaptive behavior measures normed on the general population, including people with disabilities and people without disabilities. On these standardized measures, significant limitations in adaptive behavior are operationally defined as performance that is at least two standard deviations below the mean of either (a) one of the following three types of adaptive behavior: conceptual, social, or practical, or (b) an overall (composite) score on a standardized measure of conceptual, social, and practical skills. Documentation must include information from at least two sources. The first source shall be someone from the local school who knows the child and the second source shall be someone who knows the child outside of the school environment such as a parent, guardian, or person acting as a parent.

(i). Interpretation of results should consider the childís cultural background, socioeconomic status and any associated disabilities that may limit or impact the results of the adaptive behavior measures.

(c) Deficits in intellectual functioning and adaptive behavior must have existed prior to age 18.

(d) A child must not be determined to be a child with an Intellectual Disability if the determinant factor for that determination is:

1. Lack of appropriate instruction in reading, including the essential components of reading instruction;

2.Lack of appropriate instruction in math;

3. Lack of appropriate instruction in written expression;

4. Limited English proficiency;

5. Visual, hearing or motor disability;

6. Emotional disturbances;

7. Cultural factors;

8. Environmental or economic disadvantage; or

9.Atypical educational history (multiple school attendance, lack of attendance, etc.).

Moderate intellectual disability (MOID).

(1) Intellectual functioning ranging from an upper limit of approximately 55 to a lower limit of approximately 40; and

(2) Deficits in adaptive behavior that significantly limit a childís effectiveness in meeting the standards of maturation, learning, personal independence or social responsibility, and especially school performance that is expected of the individualís age-level and cultural group as determined by clinical judgment.

Severe intellectual disability (SID).

(1) Intellectual functioning ranging from an upper limit of approximately 40 to a lower limit of approximately 25; and

 (2) Deficits in adaptive behavior that significantly limit a childís effectiveness in meeting the standards of maturation, learning, personal independence or social responsibility and especially school performance that is expected of the individualís age-level and cultural group as determined by clinical judgment.

Profound intellectual disability (PID).

(1) Intellectual functioning below approximately 25; and

(2) Deficits in adaptive behavior that significantly limit a childís effectiveness in meeting the standards of maturation, learning, personal independence or social responsibility and especially school performance that is expected of the child's age-level and cultural group, as determined by clinical judgment.

For information regarding Eligibility for Intellectually Disabled services please refer to the Georgia Department of Education Rules and Regulations:  http://public.doe.k12.ga.us/_documents/doe/legalservices/160-4-7-.05.pdf

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